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My Legislators' Key Votes

How my representative and senator voted on important or interesting measures
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Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786-7886. gerry.pollet@leg.wa.gov
Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786 - 7818 . javier.valdez@leg.wa.gov
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786-7690. david.frockt@leg.wa.gov

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Permalink: https://www.washingtonvotes.org/MyLegislatorsKeyVotes.aspx?LegisIDs=0,27123,32196,143796

Senate Bill 5092: Making 2021-2023 fiscal biennium operating appropriations. Passed the House on April 3, 2021 by a vote of 57-41. on April 3, 2021
This is the House version of the proposed spending plan for the 2021-23 biennium. It replaces the $59.2 billion plan passed by the Senate last week with a proposal for $58.4 billion in spending. As passed by both chambers, the proposed plans depend on passage of a state income tax on capital gains and would nearly empty the state’s “rainy day” reserve fund. They also assume passage of cap-and-trade and low-carbon fuel standards bills. Both proposals exceed the $53.7 billion plan proposed by Gov. Inslee last December and the current 2019-21 $51.5 billion operating budget. The bill must now go back to the Senate for approval of the House changes, which is unlikely. Instead, lead budget writers from both houses normally meet behind closed doors to work out their differences and craft a unified plan before another vote by both chambers as a whole. After final passage, the agreed-upon budget plan would then go to Governor Inslee for his consideration and approval before it is enacted into law.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5126: Concerning the Washington climate commitment act. Passed the Senate on April 8, 2021 by a vote of 25-24. on April 8, 2021
This bill would establish a “cap-and-trade” program for greenhouse gas emissions to be implemented by the Department of Ecology. The program would enable businesses to buy allowances from the state to offset greenhouse gas emissions in excess of set limits to be determined by the State Department of Ecology. Money from these allowances would go to the Forward Flexible Account to be spent for specified purposes, including clean transportation, natural climate resiliency, clean energy transition and assistance, and energy efficiency projects. The bill would require that an Environmental Justice and Equity Advisory Panel be convened to provide recommendations on the development and implementation of the cap-and-trade program. Proponents say this bill will lead toward climate level emission reductions in an economically sound way, while placing environmental justice at the forefront. Critics argue that the program will result in large increases in fuel costs, especially when coupled with low-carbon fuel standards and other proposed gas tax increases. Washington already has one of the highest gas taxes in the nation, burdening consumers and businesses, they say. The bill must now go to the House for consideration.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1091: Reducing greenhouse gas emissions by reducing the carbon intensity of transportation fuel. Passed the Senate on April 8, 2021 by a vote of 27-20, two members excused. on April 8, 2021
This bill would direct the state Department of Ecology (Ecology) to adopt rules establishing a Clean Fuels Program (CFP) to limit the aggregate, overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per unit of transportation fuel energy to 10 percent below 2017 levels by 2028 and 20 percent below 2017 levels by 2035. It would also direct Ecology to update, prior to 2032, CFP rules to further reduce GHG emissions from each unit of transportation fuel for each year through 2050, consistent with statutory state emission reduction limits. Thursday’s Senate action on HB 1091, after lengthy debate on more than a dozen amendments, marks the first time a low-carbon fuel standard bill has passed the Senate. Previous measures were passed by the House over the last three years, but failed to advance in the Senate. HB 1091 passed the House in February by a 56-42 vote. Because the Senate amended HB 1091, it must now go back to the House for consideration. If the Senate amendments are approved, the bill would be sent to the governor for his signature.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5038: Prohibiting the open carry of certain weapons at public demonstrations and the state capitol. Passed the House on March 28, 2021 by a vote of 50-47, one member excused. on March 28, 2021
The bill would prohibit the open carry of a firearm or other weapons at or near public demonstrations, the west state capitol grounds, capitol grounds buildings, and other legislative locations. It provides an exception for federal, state,and local law enforcement officers, and would not apply to persons with a valid concealed pistol license. It would make violation of these prohibitions a gross misdemeanor. The bill passed after a five-hour debate during which more than a dozen amendments were voted down. An amendment by Rep. Drew Hansen (D-Kitsap) to add an emergency clause to the bill was adopted by voice vote. Critics of the bill said it violates the federal and state constitutional rights of citizens, and that the emergency clause is designed to prevent a referendum vote by the people on this new restrictive measure. House Speaker Laurie Jinkins (D-Tacoma) said that the Washington State Patrol (WSP) asked for the emergency clause to be added to the bill due to “the violence that has been seen on or around the Capitol campus over the course of the last year.” However, the WSP issued a statement that it “did not make, and was not planning to make any such request.” The bill’s sponsor, Sen. Patty Kuderer (D-Bellevue) later said that the claim about a WSP request for the emergency clause was a misunderstanding due to the virtual nature of this year’s session. The bill passed the Senate a month ago, but because the House added amendments, it must now return to the Senate for approval or rejection of the amendments before final passage.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5092: Making 2021-2023 fiscal biennium operating appropriations. Passed the Senate on April 1, 2021 by a vote of 27-22. on April 1, 2021
This is the Senate Democrats’ proposal for the 2021-23 state operating budget. The plan would spend a record $59.2 billion on state programs in the next two years, nearly $8 billion more than the $51.5 billion budget for the current 2019-21 biennium. As passed by the Senate, the plan assumes passage of a constitutionally questionable capital gains state income tax and would significantly reduce the state’s “rainy day” reserve funds. Senate Republicans offered a floor amendment to replace the proposal with a plan that would spend $55.2 billion over the next two years, saying it would pay for needed state programs without new or increased taxes. It would also keep more than $1.8 billion in the state’s reserve fund, compared to the $400 million the bill as proposed by Democrats would leave. The amendment was rejected by an unrecorded voice vote. Senate Democrats said their spending plan would “respond to the needs that the pandemic highlighted, and include millions for the state’s public health system, child care and early learning and efforts on affordable housing and efforts to reduce homelessness.” Republicans argued that lawmakers should not impose new taxes in the midst of a pandemic, and that the capital gains income tax is illegal under state law and litigation is certain if the legislature ultimately approves the tax. The House is expected to vote on the $58.3 billion plan proposed by House Democrats (HB 1094) on Saturday, April 3rd. Thereafter, legislative leaders will work to iron out the differences between the versions passed in each chamber before sending a final version to the governor’s desk.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1277: Providing for an additional revenue source for eviction prevention and housing stability services. Passed the House on March 28, 2021 by a vote of 57-40, one member excused. on March 28, 2021
This bill would add a $100 surcharge on fees collected by county auditors when a document is recorded. All of the money collected would go to the state to help pay for various housing programs, including the Affordable Housing for All Account, the Landlord Mitigation Program Account, and the Eviction Prevention Rental Assistance Account. In addition, funds may be used for project-based vouchers for nonprofit housing providers, foreclosure prevention services, rental assistance for people experiencing homelessness, and tenant education and legal assistance. Proponents said the bill would provide needed assistance to renters affected by the COVID epidemic and help ease homelessness and affordable housing concerns. Opponents said the surcharges would impose millions of dollars in added costs to housing providers already struggling with restrictions on their businesses, such as ongoing eviction moratoriums. The bill was referred to the Senate Ways and Means Committee and is scheduled for a public hearing on April 5, 2021.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5229: Concerning health equity continuing education for health care professionals. Passed the House on March 24, 2021 by a vote of 57-41. on March 24, 2021
This bill would require health care professionals to complete health equity education training at least once every four years. It would require these courses to teach skills that enable a health care professional to care effectively for patients from diverse cultures, groups, and communities, varying in race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexuality, religion, age, ability, and socioeconomic status. During the public hearing on the measure, proponents said the bill is needed, because “the health system is not equitable.” They said that health professionals should be aware of their own biases, and learn to be more sensitive to the health needs of different communities. No testimony in opposition to the bill was offered. The bill passed by a 35-14 vote in the Senate last month. Proposed amendments in the Senate to allow health care professionals to opt out and to limit the cost of such courses were rejected. The House amended the bill to move the date on which information must be provided about available courses from July 1, 2022, to July 1, 2023. The bill must now return to the Senate for approval or rejection of the House amendment.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1078: Restoring voter eligibility for all persons convicted of a felony offense who are not in total confinement under the jurisdiction of the department of corrections. Passed the Senate on March 24, 2021 by a vote of 27-22. on March 24, 2021
This bill would automatically restore voting rights to felons immediately upon their release from state prison. Under current law, released felons must wait until they finish all conditions of their release, including community supervision before they can re-register to vote. In committee testimony, proponents estimated that some 26,000 felons would immediately regain their right to vote under this bill, even though they may still be serving their sentences outside of total confinement on probation or community supervision. They said the bill “is about restoring the right to vote. People with felony convictions who have been released into the community, or who are on work release, are working and paying taxes just like everyone else.” Opponents said that the right to vote should not be restored to felons “until they have fully paid their debt to society.” The bill passed in the House last month by a 57-41 vote and is now on its way to the governor for his signature.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1477: Implementing the national 988 system to enhance and expand behavioral health crisis response and suicide prevention services. Passed the House on March 17, 2021 by a vote of 78-18, two members excused. on March 17, 2021
In October 2020, Congress passed the National Suicide Hotline Designation Act of 2020, The act designates the number 988 as the universal telephone number within the United States for accessing the National Suicide Prevention and Mental Health Crisis Hotline system maintained by Lifeline and the Veterans Crisis Line. HB 1477 would require the state Department of Health and state Health Care Authority to establish state crisis call center hubs and an enhanced crisis response system to implement the national 988 system in this state. It would create a 988 Implementation Team and Crisis Response Improvement Strategy Committee to plan for crisis response system enhancements. The bill would impose new taxes and fees on commercial mobile services or Internet protocol-enabled voice services to pay for activities related to an enhanced crisis response.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5096: Concerning an excise tax on gains from the sale or exchange of certain capital assets. Passed the Senate on March 6, 2021 by a vote of 25-24. on March 6, 2021
As passed by the Senate, this bill would impose a 7% percent tax on income derived from the capital gains resulting from the sale of long-term assets. The tax would exempt some assets, such as real estate, and would be levied on income over $250,000 for all taxpayers required to file for the tax. The tax would be calculated on the basis of a taxpayer’s federal income tax return, which would be required to be included in the state filing. The bill is controversial, because Washington’s state constitution prohibits the kind of graduated tax on income the bill would impose. Proponents have maintained that the tax would not be on income but would be an excise, or “transaction” tax, despite clear findings by the IRS and all 50 states that show that capital gains are income. Much of the debate and some of the proposed amendments centered on this issue, with some Senators questioning, for example, why taxpayers would have to submit a federal income tax return to file a state capital gains tax return if it is not, in fact, an income tax. Opponents, including some Democrats, also argued that the new tax is not needed right now, because expected revenue projections, to be released on March 17th, anticipate a greater than expected increase in state tax collections for this biennium. The bill was sent to the House Finance Committee, which has scheduled a public hearing on the bill for March 15, 2021.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1236: Limiting the reasons for eviction, refusal to continue, and termination a tenant’s lease by a landlord. Passed the House on March 7, 2021 by a vote of 54-44. on March 7, 2021
This bill would revise the state’s Residential Landlord Tenant Act to require landlords to provide valid reasons for evicting a tenant as specified in the bill, including failure to pay rent, unlawful activity and nuisance issues, Current law allows landlords to end month-to-month leases after 20-days notice without providing a reason. If tenants don’t leave, landlords could evict them. The bill provides that tenants could not be evicted for failure to pay rent during the COVID-19 pandemic, extending the moratorium on evictions Governor Inslee imposed last year until the end of the public health emergency is declared by federal and state authorities. Supporters said the proposal would cut down on arbitrary or biased lease terminations and evictions even after the public health emergency ends. Opponents said the bill would force rental property owners to renew a tenant’s expiring lease and allow occupants to stay on the property even if they damage the property. This would increase burdens on landlords struggling to cover their costs during the pandemic and make it harder to remove problem tenants, they said. The bill was sent to the Senate Housing and Local Government Committee for further consideration.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5237: Expanding accessible, affordable child care and early childhood development programs. Passed the Senate on March 6, 2021 by a vote of 28-21. on March 6, 2021
Called the “Fair Start for Kids Act” by its sponsors, the bill would increase subsidies for licensed child care providers, reduce co-pays, and expand eligibility for programs like the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program. The cost for this expansion would be about $720 million over the next four years. Supporters said much of this cost could be covered by federal funds to be made available to the state by the COVID Relief bill passed by Congress. Opponents argued against the expanded mandates and entitlements proposed by the bill, saying they would result in new taxes. The best way to expand access to child care, they said, would be to reduce regulations on child care providers. The bill was sent to the House Committee on Children, Youth andFamilies, which has scheduled a public hearing for March 18, 2021.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1213: Expanding accessible, affordable child care and early childhood development programs. Passed the House on March 9, 2021 by a vote of 58-38, two members excused. on March 9, 2021
This is the companion measure to SB 5237 with essentially the same provisions. It would increase eligibility and decrease copayments in the Working Connections Child Care Program and expand eligibility in the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program. It would also provide for increased rates, training, grants, and services for child care and early learning providers. The bill was sent to the Senate Early Learning and K-12 Education Committee for further consideration.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1310: Concerning permissible uses of force by law enforcement and correctional officers. Passed the House on March 6, 2021 by a vote of 55-42, one member excused. on March 6, 2021
This bill would establish a statewide standard for the permissible use of force by law enforcement and corrections officers. Under the bill, a peace officer may use physical force against another person when necessary to effect an arrest, prevent an escape, or otherwise protect against an imminent threat of bodily injury to the peace officer or another person. A peace officer may use deadly force against another person only when necessary to protect against an imminent threat of serious physical injury or death to the officer or another person. The bill was sent to the Senate Law and Justice Committee, which has scheduled a public hearing for March 16, 2021.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1091: Reducing greenhouse gas emissions by reducing the carbon intensity of transportation fuel. Passed the House on February 27, 2021 by a vote of 52-46. on February 27, 2021
This bill would direct the state Department of Ecology (Ecology) to adopt rules establishing a Clean Fuels Program (CFP) to limit the aggregate, overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per unit of transportation fuel energy to 10 percent below 2017 levels by 2028 and 20 percent below 2017 levels by 2035. It would also direct Ecology to update, prior to 2032, CFP rules to further reduce GHG emissions from each unit of transportation fuel for each year through 2050, consistent with statutory state emission reduction limits. This is the third time the House has passed low-carbon fuels legislation in three years. Previous measures failed to advance in the Senate. The bill’s prime sponsor, Rep. Joe Fitzgibbons (D-Seattle) said that the move to limit carbon emissions is long overdue, and that “let this be the year we can say we took action.” Republicans said that, if passed, the bill would raise raise the price of gasoline and diesel for Washington’s consumers and businesses. Agriculture would be especially hard-hit, according to Rep. Mary Dye (R-Pomeroy), who said during the floor debate that the bill would impact most of the agricultural producers in this state. Rep. Dye proposed an amendment to exclude diesel fuel from the bill, saying that diesel provides the energy needed to do most agricultural work, like vehicles that help growers plant and harvest crops. The amendment to help farmers was not adopted.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1054: Establishing requirements for tactics and equipment used by peace officers. Passed the House on February 27, 2021 by a vote of 54-43, one member excused. on February 27, 2021
This bill is a sweeping proposal that would ban or restrict a wide range of police tactics, from chokeholds and neck restraints to use of military gear. It would also establish new statewide policies on vehicle pursuits and create a task force to develop policies for the use of police dogs. More than a dozen amendments to the bill were proposed during the floor debate last Saturday, including amendments that were adopted to remove several provisions in the original bill— such as banning tear gas, and the use of police dogs. The bill, as passed, would allow law enforcement agencies to use tear gas, but only as “necessary to alleviate a present risk of serious harm posed by a riot, barricaded subject, or hostage situation.” The bill was sent to the Senate Law and Justice Committee, which has scheduled a public hearing on the measure for March 11th.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5066: Concerning a peace officer's duty to intervene. Passed the Senate on February 23, 2021 by a vote of 28-21. on February 23, 2021
This bill would require law enforcement officers to intervene and try to stop excessive force by fellow officers. Police officers who witness excessive or attempted excessive force by a fellow officer would need to step in, or face suspension or decertification. The bill would also require that officers report any wrongdoing by another officer to that officer’s supervisor. During debate, some opponents of the measure said they supported the broader intent of the bill regarding police accountability, but said parts of the bill were too subjective. Senate Republicans proposed nine amendments to clarify the bill’s language and to more precisely define terms like “excessive force” or “intervention.” The amendments were rejected by voice vote. The bill was sent to the House Public Safety Committee, which has scheduled a public hearing on the measure for March 12th.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1141: Increasing access to the death with dignity act. Passed the House on February 25, 2021 by a vote of 60-37, one member excused. on February 25, 2021
Washington’s Death with Dignity Act, which was approved by the state’s voters as Initiative 1000 in 2008, allows adult residents of Washington who have a terminal illness with six months or less to live to request medication to end their life. The patient is allowed to self-administer such medication. The patient's attending physician is responsible for determining that the patient has a terminal condition. This determination must be confirmed by a consulting physician. This bill would change the provisions of the voter-approved law to allow advanced registered nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and osteopathic physician assistants to perform the duties of an attending or consulting medical provider under the Death with Dignity Act. It would also reduce the currently required 15-day waiting period between the first and second requests for medications to 72 hours. Proponents said that there are many people who have wanted to use the law, but have been frustrated by time delays and the inability to find participating physicians. Opponents argued that the bill would remove the protections in the original law and would go far beyond what the voters approved, which was for only physicians to authorize assisted suicide after a 15-day waiting period. The bill was sent to the Senate Health and Long Term Care Committee for further consideration.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1068: Exempting election security information from public records disclosure. Passed the House on February 24, 2021 by a vote of 61-37. on February 24, 2021
This bill would exempt certain election security information from disclosure under the Public Records Act that requires all state and local governmental entities to make public records available to the public. The bill would exempt: • continuity of operations plans for elections. • security audits. • security risk assessments. • security test results that relate to physical security or cybersecurity of election operations or infrastructure Proponents said the bill is needed to keep critical election security information from people who might seek to harm elections. Opponents voiced concern that it would reduce government transparency and erode public trust in the election process. The bill was sent to the Senate State Government and Elections Committee for further consideration.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1009: Concerning student health plans. Passed the House on February 23, 2021 by a vote of 57-40, one member excused. on February 23, 2021
This bill would require student health plans to provide coverage for the abortion of a pregnancy. Under current law, health plans that provide coverage for maternity care or services must also provide coverage to permit abortions. Student health plans are generally exempt from this requirement. The bill would extend the requirement to cover abortions to student health plans deemed by the Insurance Commissioner to have a short-term limited purpose or duration, or to be guaranteed renewable while the covered person is enrolled as a regular full-time undergraduate or graduate student at an accredited higher education institution. The bill was sent to the Senate Health and Long Term Care Committee for further consideration.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5038: Prohibiting the open carry of certain weapons at public demonstrations and the state capitol. Passed on February 25, 2021 by a vote of 28-20, one member excused. on February 25, 2021
This bill would ban open-carry of weapons within 250 feet of permitted public demonstrations and at the state capitol. Current Washington law affirms citizen rights under the Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution to openly carry firearms, except in certain locations such as courthouses and jails. Proponents said the bill would not infringe on those rights, because it only adds the Capitol to the list of places where open-carry of firearms is prohibited. Opponents argued that the bill would take away legal gun owners’ ability to protect themselves if they feel unsafe at or near a public demonstration. They also said the language in the bill is too vague, making it difficult to enforce. The bill is on its way to the House for further consideration.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5051: Concerning state oversight and accountability of peace officers and corrections officers. Passed the Senate on February 25, 2021 by a vote of 26-19, one member absent, 3 members excused. on February 25, 2021
This bill would greatly expand the Washington state Criminal Justice Training Commission’s (CJTC) authority and capability to investigate police misconduct and revoke or suspend a police officer’s professional certification. It would increase the number of reasons for which officers could lose their badge, adding use of force in violation of law or department policy to those reasons. Under the bill, the CJTC would be allowed to add investigators to pursue more cases against officers, and to suspend an officer for a broader range of alleged misconduct. The CJTC, and other boards and panels that review misconduct cases would be made up by a majority of civilians unaffiliated with law enforcement. The CJTC would also be authorized to begin decertification processes against officers accused of wrongdoing without waiting for a local sheriff or police chief to discipline such officers. Proponents said the bill’s intent is to restore public confidence that law enforcement officers, who are given the power of a badge and a gun to enforce the law, are appropriately exercising those powers. Opponents said the bill would give the state too much control over local police decisions, and demonstrate a lack of support for law enforcement officers who put their lives in danger to protect the public. The bill is headed to the House for further consideration.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1072: Removing one of the restrictions on the use of civil legal aid funds. Passed the House on February 12, 2012 by a vote of 56-40, two members excused. on February 12, 2021
The legislature in 2005 established the Office of Civil Legal Aid (OCLA) as an independent judicial branch agency to administer and oversee state funds appropriated by the legislature for the provision of civil legal aid services to eligible low-income people in Washington. This law imposed a number of restrictions, including that moneys distributed to qualified legal aid programs by the OCLA may not be used directly or indirectly for representation of individuals who are in the United States without legal authority. This bill would remove this prohibition, and make legal aid funds provided by taxpayers available for representation of undocumented persons.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5185: Concerning capacity to provide informed consent for health care decisions. Passed the Senate on February 16, 2021 by a vote of 30-17, two members excused. on February 16, 2021
Current Washington law allows adolescents to make health care decisions on their own behalf at age 13 related to behavioral health treatment, at age 14 related to testing for sexually transmitted diseases, and allows decisions related to personal reproductive health care, including abortions, to be made at any age. This bill would clarify language to affirm that a person is presumed to have the capacity to make health care decisions under current laws, unless subject to a guardianship that includes health care decision making. A proposed amendment that would remove the capacity of a minor to provide informed consent for abortion services was rejected by voice vote.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5229: Concerning health equity continuing education for health care professionals. Passed the Senate on February 17, 2021 by a vote of 35-14. on February 17, 2021
This bill would require health care professionals to complete health equity education training at least once every four years. It would require these courses to teach skills that enable a health care professional to care effectively for patients from diverse cultures, groups, and communities, varying in race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexuality, religion, age, ability, and socioeconomic status. During the public hearing on the measure, proponents said the bill is needed, because the health system is not equitable. They said that health professionals should be aware of their own biases, and learn to be more sensitive to the health needs of different communities. No testimony in opposition to the bill was offered. Proposed amendments to allow health care professionals to opt out and to limit the cost of such courses were rejected by voice vote.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1120: Concerning state of emergency operations impacting long-term services and supports. Passed the House on February 5, 2021 by a vote of 58-38, two members excused. on February 5, 2021
This bill would change regulatory requirements relating to background checks and training for long-term care workers in the event of a pandemic, natural disaster, or other declared state of emergency. It would permit a long-term care worker who has not been disqualified by the state background check to continue to work and have unsupervised access to vulnerable adults, pending completion of the FBI fingerprint check. The current requirement that the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) check a long-term care worker against the National Sex Offender Registry would be eliminated If a pandemic, natural disaster, or other declared state of emergency impacts the ability of long-term care workers to complete required training, the bill would enable the DSHS to adopt rules allowing the workers additional time to complete the training. Proponents of the bills said that long-term care facilities were disproportionately impacted by COVID-19. The facilities, therefore, could not operate as usual. This caused challenges relating to training, staff retention, inspections, and background checks. They said this bill would provide long-term care facilities with the flexibility they need to meet the needs of residents. Opponents of the bill said that a large proportion of COVID-19 infections and deaths are linked to nursing homes. They said that this exposes deficiencies in the staffing and design of these facilities, and that there is need for reform across the system. This bill is not the solution, they said.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1088: Concerning potential impeachment disclosures relating to law enforcement officers. Passed the House on February 10, 2021 by a vote of 61-37. on February 10, 2021
This bill would require law enforcement agencies to report to prosecuting authorities an officer's misconduct affecting credibility or any act of an officer that may potentially support a defendant’s not-guilty plea. It would also requires law enforcement agencies, prior to hiring an officer with previous law enforcement experience, to inquire whether the officer has ever been subject to removal procedures. Supporters of the bill said it is about whether you can rely on an officer for the truth. The bill would create best standards and online training opportunities, and would require law enforcement agencies to inquire about this issue before hiring. Opponents said the bill does not go far enough. They said a better approach would be to create a working group to report back, so that the legislature could put these standards in statute. They pointed out that there is a lack of uniformity on how potential impeachment disclosure is handled in counties across the state.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1089: Concerning compliance audits of requirements relating to peace officers and law enforcement agencies. Passed the House on February 10, 2021 by a vote of 80-18. on February 10, 2021
This bill would authorize the State Auditor to review a deadly force investigation to determine whether those involved complied with all applicable rules and procedures. It would also authorize the State Auditor, upon request by the Criminal Justice Training Commission, to review a law enforcement agency to ensure compliance with all applicable rules and procedures governing the training and certification of the agency's peace officers. Proponents of the bill said that audits of deadly force investigations would ensure quality, objective, non-biased investigations. The purpose of auditing deadly force investigations would be to review whether the relevant statutory and administrative rules are being followed. Audits would not be used to judge the decisions made at the end of investigations, they said. Opponents of the bill said that the intent of the bill is good, but the scope of the proposed audits should be clarified and narrowed. They said a deadly force investigation audit should only review whether the investigation was conducted in compliance with the relevant statutory and administrative rules, not all rules and procedures generally.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5061: Concerning unemployment insurance. Passed the House on January 29, 2021 by a vote of 89-8, one member excused. on January 29, 2021
This bill would provide unemployment insurance tax relief by not charging rate increases to employers for unemployment benefits during a public health emergency for high-risk individuals unable to work from home and shared work benefits paid or reimbursed by the federal government. For workers, the bill would expand eligibility for those in high-risk households and waive the waiting period when federally reimbursed. It would also increase the minimum benefit from 15 to 20 percent of the average weekly wage and limit benefits to a person's weekly wage.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1368: Responding to the COVID-19 pandemic through state actions supported by federal funding. Passed the House on February 1, 2021 by a vote of 61-36, one member excused. on February 1, 2021
This bill would distribute $2.2 billion in federal COVID relief funds made available to the state. It includes $668 million for school funding, and $618 for a Public Health Response account for programs such as COVID testing and contact tracing. A further $68 million is earmarked for vaccine distribution and administration. The bill would also provide $365 million for housing and rental assistance, and $240 million in grants for Washington’s small businesses. Also, $65 million would be allocated for the Washington Immigrant Relief fund, and $50 million in financial help for child care providers.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5121: Expanding eligibility for the graduated reentry program. Passed the Senate on February 3, 2021 by a vote of 28-21. on February 3, 2021
The bill would expand eligibility for the Graduated Reentry Program in the Washington Department of Corrections (DOC) that allows incarcerated persons to serve part of their sentence in the community rather than in prison. Under current law, which was created in 2018, individuals must have served at least 12 months in confinement at a state prison before becoming eligible to serve up to the last six months of their sentence in the community with electronic home monitoring under the jurisdiction of the DOC. SB 5121 would reduce the required confinement time a person must serve in prison before eligibility for the reentry program to six months for most offenders who are not under a deportation order or civil commitment. It would further reduce the required confinement time to four months for those who are not currently serving a sentence for a sex, violent, or crime-against-a-person offense. The bill would also allow eligible inmates to serve the entire remaining term of their sentence at home, with electronic monitoring supervised by the DOC.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5044: Concerning professional learning, equity, cultural competency, and dismantling institutional racism in the public school system. Passed the Senate on January 27, 2021 by a vote of 30-19. on January 27, 2021
This bill would add equity, diversity, inclusion, and anti-racism to existing cultural competency standards and training for school board directors, district staff, and school staff. It would direct school districts to prioritize one of three professional learning days to focus first on these topics. The curriculum would require each of Washington 295 school districts to adopt the training. None of the bill’s proposed mandates would apply to private schools, homeschooling or non-public online education programs. Amendments to make such training voluntary and to expand it beyond race to students with disabilities failed by voice vote.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Senate Bill 5061: Concerning unemployment insurance. Passed the Senate on January 27, 2021 by a vote of 42-7. on January 27, 2021
This bill would provide unemployment insurance tax relief by not charging rate increases to employers for unemployment benefits during a public health emergency for high-risk individuals unable to work from home and shared work benefits paid or reimbursed by the federal government. For workers, the bill would expand eligibility for those in high-risk households and waive the waiting period when federally reimbursed. It would also increase the minimum benefit from 15 to 20 percent of the average weekly wage and limit benefits to a person's weekly wage.
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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House Bill 1121: Concerning the emergency waiver of graduation requirements. Passed the House on January 27, 2021 by a vote of 85-11, two members excused. on January 27, 2021
This bill would authorize the State Board of Education to permit public and private schools to grant individual student emergency waivers from credit and subject area graduation requirements, graduation pathway requirements, or both, due to a significant disruption from a local, state, or national emergency. Students in the graduating class of 2020 and subsequent classes would be eligible for the emergency waiver program.
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle) (D) 'Voted Yes'
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Showing 34 Results        Show Entire Session

Contact my lawmakers
Rep. Gerry Pollet (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786-7886. gerry.pollet@leg.wa.gov
Rep. Javier Valdez (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786 - 7818 . javier.valdez@leg.wa.gov
Sen. David Frockt (Seattle), District 46. (360) 786-7690. david.frockt@leg.wa.gov



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