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2022 House Bill 1630: Establishing restrictions on the possession of weapons in certain locations
Introduced by Rep. Tana Senn (East King County) (D) on January 10, 2022
Referred to the House Civil Rights & Judiciary Committee on January 10, 2022
Substitute offered in the House on January 21, 2022
• Prohibits the open carry of firearms and other weapons while knowingly being in: a local government building used in connection with meetings of the governing body of the local government; or any location of a public meeting or hearing of the governing body of a local government during the meeting or hearing. • Prohibits the carrying and possession of firearms and other weapons in areas of facilities while being used for official meetings of a school district board of directors. • Prohibits the carrying and possession of firearms and other weapons in election-related offices and facilities, and requires election officials to post signs at election-related facilities providing notice of the restriction. • Makes violations of these restrictions a gross misdemeanor offense and creates exemptions from the restrictions.
Amendment offered by Rep. Drew Hansen (Kitsap) (D) on February 14, 2022
Specifically lists spring blade knives in the list of weapons prohibited in election-related facilities. Includes language to avoid a double amendment by reenacting RCW 9.41.280 and providing a contingent effective date.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on February 14, 2022
Amendment offered by Rep. Peter Abbarno (Centralia City) (R) on February 14, 2022
Requires that signs providing notice of the restrictions on possessing firearms and other weapons must be posted at: (1) Facilities being used for official meetings of a school district board of directors; and (2) local government buildings used in connection with meetings of their governing bodies, or areas of facilities while being used for such meetings.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on February 14, 2022
Amendment offered by Rep. Brad Klippert (Benton) (R) on February 14, 2022
Removes the following from the list of weapons that a person may not carry onto or possess in election-related facilities: (1) Devices commonly known as stun guns, including projectile stun guns; and (2) any device, object, or instrument that is used or intended to be used as a weapon with the intent to injure a person by an electric shock, charge, or impulse.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 14, 2022
Amendment offered by Rep. Brad Klippert (Benton) (R) on February 14, 2022
Modifies the description of prohibited devices or objects that are used or intended to be used as a weapon with the intent to injure a person by an electronic shock, charge, or impulse, by replacing "intent to injure" a person with "intent to temporarily disable" a person.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 14, 2022
Amendment offered by Rep. Jim Walsh (Aberdeen) (R) on February 14, 2022
Removes language that specifically states that prohibited weapons, whether concealed or openly carried, may not be possessed in ballot counting centers or areas of facilities being used as a ballot counting center (but does not expand the underlying exemption for concealed pistol license holders to carry a concealed pistol in election-related facilities other than ballot counting locations).
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 14, 2022
Amendment offered by Rep. Jim Walsh (Aberdeen) (R) on February 14, 2022
Provides that the restriction on carrying or possessing firearms and weapons in election-related facilities applies only to openly carrying or openly possessing firearms and weapons in those locations.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 14, 2022
Amendment offered by Rep. Alex Ybarra (Grant County) (R) on February 14, 2022
Strikes the provision establishing the following penalties for a violation of the restriction on carrying or possessing firearms and weapons in election-related facilities: gross misdemeanor offense; revocation and surrender of the person's concealed pistol license (CPL), if any; and prohibition on the person applying for a CPL for three years.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 14, 2022
Amendment offered by Rep. Jesse Young (Gig Harbor) (R) on February 14, 2022
Provides that the restriction on carrying or possessing firearms and weapons on school premises, school transportation, facilities while being used exclusively by schools, and at school board meetings, applies only to openly carrying or 17 openly possessing firearms and weapons in these locations.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 14, 2022
Received in the Senate on February 16, 2022
Referred to the Senate Law & Justice Committee on February 16, 2022
Referred to the Senate Rules Committee on February 24, 2022
Amendment offered by Sen. Mike Padden (Spokane Valley) (R) on March 1, 2022
Removes provisions that provide for the revocation of concealed pistol licenses for violations of carry or possession prohibitions of firearms.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on March 1, 2022
Amendment offered by Sen. Jeff Holy (Cheney) (R) on March 1, 2022
Lowers the penalty for first time violations of carry or possession prohibitions of firearms or other weapons from a gross misdemeanor offense to a misdemeanor offense. Makes second and subsequent violations a gross misdemeanor.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on March 1, 2022
Amendment offered by Sen. Phil Fortunato (Auburn) (R) on March 1, 2022
Exempts concealed pistol license holders and persons exempt from the concealed pistol licensing requirement from liability when in possession of a pistol while attending official meetings of a school district board of directors.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on March 1, 2022
Amendment offered by Sen. Kevin Van De Wege (Sequim) (D) on March 1, 2022
Exempts concealed pistol license holders and persons exempt from the concealed pistol licensing requirement from restrictions on the possession of a pistol while attending official meetings of a school district board of directors held off school district owned or leased propert.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on March 1, 2022
Amendment offered by Sen. Keith Wagoner (Sedro-Woolley) (R) on March 1, 2022
Removes the open carry prohibition of a firearm or other weapon for city, town, county, or other municipality buildings and for locations of public meetings or hearings of the governing body of a city, town, county, or other municipality during the hearing or meeting. Retains current law provisions regarding open carry prohibitions and exemptions on the state capitol campus.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on March 1, 2022
Amendment offered by Sen. Shelly Short (Addy) (R) on March 1, 2022
Exempts fully uniformed color guard and honor guard affiliated with a veterans' service organization recognized by the Washington Department of Veterans Affairs or affiliated with the national Sons of the American Revolution or Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War from liability when carrying a firearm or other weapon while actively participating in, walking to, and leaving permitted events on the capitol campus; city, town, county, or other municipality building used in connection with meetings of the local governing body; or any location of a public meeting or hearing of the local governing body during the hearing or meeting. Allows the Department of Enterprise Services to make such reasonable rules and orders necessary to properly administer and enforce exemptions for authorized law enforcement, members of the armed forces, and fully uniformed color guard and honor guard.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on March 1, 2022
Received in the House on March 7, 2022
House concurred in Senate amendments. Passed final passage.
Signed by Gov. Jay Inslee on March 23, 2022

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