Legislation watch

Search all years.

2019 House Bill 1638: Promoting immunity against vaccine preventable diseases
Introduced by Rep. Paul Harris (Vancouver) (R) on January 25, 2019
  Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Health Care & Wellness Committee on January 25, 2019
Referred to the House Rules Committee on February 28, 2019
Amendment offered by Rep. Matt Shea (Spokane Valley) (R) on March 5, 2019
Exempts from vaccination requirements an individual who fails to mount a positive antibody response following a complete vaccine series. Requires such an individual to be considered a non-responder.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on March 5, 2019
Amendment offered by Rep. Matt Shea (Spokane Valley) (R) on March 5, 2019
Grandfathers high school students holding existing exemptions while the students are enrolled in high school.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on March 5, 2019
Amendment offered by Rep. Jesse Young (Gig Harbor) (R) on March 5, 2019
Clarifies that the reasons for which a health care practitioner may certify that a vaccine is not advisable for a child include, but are not limited to, if the child has a biological parent, brother, or sister, with a documented history of immune system problems or a documented adverse reaction to a particular vaccine required by rule of the Board of Health.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on March 5, 2019
Amendment offered by Rep. Jesse Young (Gig Harbor) (R) on March 5, 2019
Exempts a child from mandatory vaccine requirements if a parent, legal guardian, or adult in loco parentis signs and presents a written certification that the child has a biological parent, brother, or sister, with either of the following, documented by a health care practitioner: a history of immune system problems or an adverse reaction to a particular vaccine required by rule of the Board of Health.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on March 5, 2019
Amendment offered by Rep. Jesse Young (Gig Harbor) (R) on March 5, 2019
Requires, in order to exempt a child from mandatory vaccine requirements, that the parent's or sibling's history of immune system problems, or adverse reaction to a particular vaccine, be sufficient to make the particular vaccine contraindicated for the child under guidelines issued by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on March 5, 2019
Passed 57 to 40 in the House on March 5, 2019.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Removes the philosophical or personal objection exemption for the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine. Allows proof of disease immunity through laboratory evidence or history of disease to substitute for immunization.
Received in the Senate on March 8, 2019
Referred to the Senate Health & Long-Term Care Committee on March 8, 2019
Amendment offered in the Senate on April 1, 2019
Removes the provision allowing a child to be exempt from vaccine requirements if the child has a parent or sibling with a history of immune system problems or an adverse reaction to a particular vaccine. (2) Removes provisions that exempt individuals from further vaccination if they fail to mount a positive antibody response following a complete vaccine series. (3) Removes the grandfather clause for high school students who currently hold a personal exemption.
Referred to the Senate Rules Committee on April 3, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Randi Becker (Eatonville) (R) on April 17, 2019
Provides that the secretary of the Department of Health may be held civilly liable for any resulting damages if the Department fails to comply with this section.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Phil Fortunato (Auburn) (R) on April 17, 2019
Allows a parent or guardian to use any religious exemption without being required to obtain a signed statement from a health care practitioner stating the practitioner discussed the risks and benefits of immunization.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Phil Fortunato (Auburn) (R) on April 17, 2019
Allows a child to receive a separate vaccine for each required immunization.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Phil Fortunato (Auburn) (R) on April 17, 2019
Removes immunization requirements for students attending private schools.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Brad Hawkins (Douglas County) (R) on April 17, 2019
Exempts full-time running start students from immunization requirements.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Steve O'Ban (Pierce County) (R) on April 17, 2019
Requires DOH to develop an evidence-based education program to encourage vaccination and report the results of the program to the legislature by December 1, 2020.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Steve O'Ban (Pierce County) (R) on April 17, 2019
Creates a work group to study the effects of the personal and philosophical objection to vaccines.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Steve O'Ban (Pierce County) (R) on April 17, 2019
Allows students to receive services pursuant to their individualized education program regardless of vaccination status.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Mike Padden (Spokane Valley) (R) on April 17, 2019
Allows children with a family history of vaccine injury to meet the medical exemption to vaccination.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Mike Padden (Spokane Valley) (R) on April 17, 2019
Allows children who are currently exempt from immunization based on a personal or philosophical exemption to continue to use the exemption until graduation.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Mike Padden (Spokane Valley) (R) on April 17, 2019
Provides that the prohibition on a philosophical or personal objection exemption for the MMR vaccine only applies to students in grades kindergarten through twelve.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Ann Rivers (Vancouver) (R) on April 17, 2019
Expands the definition of "health care practitioner" to include practitioners licensed in other states.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Keith Wagoner (Sedro-Woolley) (R) on April 17, 2019
Clarifies that no religious test, proof, or minimum standards are to be required to be in compliance with the religious exemption.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Lynda Wilson (Clark County) (R) on April 17, 2019
The Board of Health may only require immunization for communicable diseases.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Lynda Wilson (Clark County) (R) on April 17, 2019
Requires health care providers to provide written information concerning potential adverse reactions to vaccines to individuals or their parent or guardian before administering a vaccine.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Amendment offered by Sen. Lynda Wilson (Clark County) (R) on April 17, 2019
Requires the Board of Health to receive legislative approval to add vaccines to the list of required immunizations.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on April 17, 2019
Received in the House on April 23, 2019
Signed with partial veto by Gov. Jay Inslee on May 10, 2019

Comments