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2019 House Bill 1551: Modernizing the control of certain communicable diseases
Introduced by Rep. Laurie Jinkins (Tacoma) (D) on January 24, 2019
  Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Health Care & Wellness Committee on January 24, 2019
Received in the House on January 13, 2020
Referred to the House Rules Committee on January 21, 2020
Amendment offered by Rep. Michelle Caldier (Port Orchard) (R) on February 12, 2020
Changes the age a minor may provide consent, without the consent of a parent or guardian, for treatment to avoid HIV infection from fourteen to sixteen.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 12, 2020
Amendment offered by Rep. Michelle Caldier (Port Orchard) (R) on February 12, 2020
Modifies the crime of assault in the first degree to include exposure to or transmission of an infectious disease with high morbidity or high mortality. Provides that a court may not find intent to inflict great bodily harm for purposes of the crime if there is no substantial risk of transmission or if the person took practical means to prevent transmission. Defines "infectious disease with high morbidity or high mortality" and "practical means to prevent transmission".
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 12, 2020
Amendment offered by Rep. Eileen Cody (West Seattle) (D) on February 12, 2020
Requires a person who commits the crime of intentionally transmitting HIV through sexual intercourse to a child or vulnerable adult to register as a sex offender. Provides that transmitting HIV to a child or vulnerable adult is assault in the first degree if the person intended to inflict great bodily harm.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on February 12, 2020
Amendment offered by Rep. Nicole Macri (Seattle) (D) on February 12, 2020
Modifies the definition of "health order." 2. Requires the educational and training materials the Superintendent of Public Instruction must develop for education on blood-borne pathogens, to be created in consultation with the Department of Health. 3. Restores current law providing that the Department of Health is responsible establishing criteria for and distributing funds and grants to support services for people who have HIV and may authorize the use of appropriate materials in the prevention or control of HIV infection. 4. Removes changes to provisions that expanded protections for test results of voluntary and anonymous testing for blood-borne pathogens restoring current law to cover only HIV. 5. Makes a variety of nonsubstantive, technical changes such as reordering words and removing duplicative language.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on February 12, 2020
Amendment offered by Rep. Joe Schmick (Colfax) (R) on February 12, 2020
Removes the provision creating a crime for a person to intentionally transmit HIV to another person through sexual intercourse. 2. Restores the provision providing that administering or transmitting HIV is assault in the first degree if the person intended to inflict great bodily harm. 3. Removes the provision repealing the prohibition on a person who has a sexually transmitted disease, other than HIV, from having sexual intercourse, unless the partner has been informed of the presence of the disease.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 12, 2020
Amendment offered by Rep. Joe Schmick (Colfax) (R) on February 12, 2020
Requires a person who commits the crime of intentionally transmitting HIV through sexual intercourse and transmits HIV to a child or vulnerable adult to register as a sex offender. Provides that administering, exposing, or transmitting HIV to a child or vulnerable adult is assault in the first degree if the person intended to inflict great bodily harm.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 12, 2020
Received in the Senate on February 14, 2020
Referred to the Senate Health & Long-Term Care Committee on February 14, 2020
Referred to the Senate Rules Committee on February 25, 2020
Amendment offered by Sen. Phil Fortunato (Auburn) (R) on March 3, 2020
Strikes provision designating the intentional transmission of HIV a misdemeanor or gross misdemeanor and maintains current law classifying the administration, exposure, or transmission of HIV with the intent to inflict great bodily harm a class A felony.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on March 3, 2020
Amendment offered by Sen. Phil Fortunato (Auburn) (R) on March 3, 2020
Makes the third or subsequent conviction for transmitting HIV to an unknowing partner a felony.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on March 3, 2020
Amendment offered by Sen. Steve O'Ban (Pierce County) (R) on March 3, 2020
Makes the second or subsequent conviction for transmitting HIV to an unknowing partner a felony.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on March 3, 2020
Signed by Gov. Jay Inslee on March 19, 2020

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