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2015 Senate Bill 5501: Preventing animal cruelty

Public Act 235 of 2015

Introduced by Sen. Joe Fain (Auburn) (R) on January 22, 2015
For Bill Information, please click HERE.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the Senate Law & Justice Committee on January 22, 2015
Substitute offered in the Senate on February 12, 2015
Provides for the following exemptions: The civil infraction established for leaving animals unattended in a motor vehicle subject to harm, does not apply for agriculture, rodeos, and similar lawful activities; The crime of animal fighting does not apply for agriculture, rodeos, and similar lawful activities; and The crime of animal cruelty does not apply for agriculture, rodeos, and similar lawful activities..
Referred to the Senate Rules Committee on February 13, 2015
Received in the House on March 2, 2015
Referred to the House Judiciary Committee on March 2, 2015
Amendment offered in the House on March 26, 2015
Removes amendatory language stating that the provisions of the animal cruelty chapter do not interfere with the laws regulating or any legal right to engage in agriculture, rodeos, farms, parades, use under game laws, official sport competitions licensed or regulated by the state, or the use of service animals is. (Current law exceptions to the animal cruelty statutes are unamended.) The provisions restating the limitations on the applicability of the animal cruelty chapter in several sections of the bill are removed. The section amending the Animal Cruelty in the first degree statute is modified to reinstate the current law, but retain the change under which killing an animal "while manifesting an extreme indifference to life" qualifies as Animal Cruelty in the first degree.
Amendment offered by Rep. Brad Klippert (Kennewick) (R) on April 14, 2015
Provides that the section prohibiting leaving an animal unattended under certain circumstances in which it could be harmed or killed only applies to leaving an animal unattended in a vehicle (rather than a vehicle or enclosed space).
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on April 14, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Brad Klippert (Kennewick) (R) on April 14, 2015
Removes exposure to excessive cold as one of the conditions triggering the provisions of the section prohibiting leaving an animal unattended in a vehicle or enclosed space in conditions in which the animal could be harmed or killed.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on April 14, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Brad Klippert (Kennewick) (R) on April 14, 2015
Specifies that the adequacy of the provision of food, when based on an animal's condition, is to be determined by a veterinarian.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on April 14, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Brad Klippert (Kennewick) (R) on April 14, 2015
Expands the current law exemption to the animal cruelty statutes for accepted husbandry practices in the commercial raising or slaughtering of livestock or poultry, to also apply to the noncommercial raising or slaughtering of livestock or poultry.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on April 14, 2015
Amendment offered by Rep. Brad Klippert (Kennewick) (R) on April 14, 2015
Replaces amendatory language stating that killing an animal "while manifesting an extreme indifference to life" qualifies as animal cruelty in the first degree with language stating that killing an animal "with malice" qualifies.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on April 14, 2015
Passed 59 to 38 in the House on April 14, 2015.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Creates a class 2 civil infraction that applies when an animal is confined in an enclosed space or vehicle creating a health or life-threatening situation, and permits law enforcement or animal control officers to remove the animal.
Received in the Senate on April 16, 2015
Signed with partial veto by Gov. Jay Inslee on May 11, 2015
Vetoed section that expanded the exceptions for "accepted husbandry practices" used in commercial farming to noncommercial farming, which could potentially leave livestock and other animals subject to neglect or cruelty.

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