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2018 Senate Bill 5992: Concerning trigger modification devices
Introduced by Sen. Kevin Van De Wege (Sequim) (D) on January 8, 2018
  Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the Senate Law & Justice Committee on January 8, 2018
Referred to the Senate Rules Committee on January 17, 2018
Amendment offered by Sen. Mike Padden (Spokane Valley) (R) on January 25, 2018
Defines bump-fire stock and adds bump-fire stock to the definition of a firearm; applies the same requirements and procedures for purchasing and owning a pistol or handgun to the purchase and possession of a bump-fire stock, including requiring a state and federal background check at the time of acquisition.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on January 25, 2018
Amendment offered by Sen. Hans Zeiger (Puyallup) (R) on January 25, 2018
Replaces "trigger modification device" with the term "bump-fire stock;" defines bump-fire stock as a butt stock designed to be attached to a semiautomatic firearm with the effect of increasing the rate of fire achievable with the semiautomatic firearm to that of a fully automatic firearm by using the energy from the recoil of the firearm to generate reciprocating action that facilitates repeated activation of the trigger.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on January 25, 2018
Received in the House on January 29, 2018
Referred to the House Judiciary Committee on January 29, 2018
Amendment offered by Rep. Paul Graves (Fall City) (R) on February 23, 2018
Requires the Washington State Patrol (WSP) to establish and administer a bump-fire stock buy-back program to allow a person to relinquish a bump-fire stock to the WSP or participating local law enforcement agencies in exchange for a monetary payment of $150..
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on February 23, 2018
Amendment offered by Rep. Brad Klippert (Kennewick) (R) on February 23, 2018
Strikes the provisions of the bill and provides instead that it is unlawful for any person to manufacture, buy, sell, loan, transfer, or furnish to another person, a bump-fire stock. A violation is a class C felony ranked at seriousness level III..
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 23, 2018
Amendment offered by Rep. Jay Rodne (North Bend) (R) on February 23, 2018
Allows a person with a disability who has a demonstrated physical need for a bump-fire stock in order toeffectively operate a firearm to own, possess or control, and transport a bump-fire stock.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 23, 2018
Amendment offered by Rep. Jay Rodne (North Bend) (R) on February 23, 2018
Or control, and transport a bump-fire stock if they have a Allows veterans who have a disability to own, possess or control, and transport a bump-fire stock if they have ademonstrated physical need for a bump-fire stock in order to effectively operate a firearm. Defines veteran as those who have received an honorable discharge or a discharge with an honorable record..
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 23, 2018
Amendment offered by Rep. Matt Shea (Spokane Valley) (R) on February 23, 2018
Allows active duty members of the U.S. armed forces, members of the National Guard or reserves of the U.S. armed forces, and veterans who have received an honorable discharge or discharge with an honorable record to own, possess or control, and transport bump-fire stocks.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 23, 2018
Amendment offered by Rep. Matt Shea (Spokane Valley) (R) on February 23, 2018
Allows law enforcement officers to own, possess or control, and transport bump-fire stocks.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 23, 2018
Amendment offered by Rep. Matt Shea (Spokane Valley) (R) on February 23, 2018
Allows veterans who have a disability, regardless of whether the disability is service connected, to own, possess orcontrol, and transport a bump-fire stock. Defines veteran as those who have received an honorable discharge or a discharge with an honorable record.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 23, 2018
Amendment offered by Rep. Luanne Van Werven (Lynden) (R) on February 23, 2018
Strikes all provisions of the bill. Requires the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs (WASPC) to conduct a review of the number and types of crimes in which a firearm with a bump-fire stock was used in the commission of or in furtherance of a criminal offense. The WASPC must conduct this review within existing resources and report its findings to the Legislature by December 1, 2018.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 23, 2018
Amendment offered by Rep. Jesse Young (Gig Harbor) (R) on February 23, 2018
Strikes the criminal offense and sentencing provisions making it unlawful to manufacture, own, buy, sell, loan, furnish, transport, or have in possession or control any bump-fire stock or parts designed and intended for use in a bump-fire stock.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on February 23, 2018
Received in the Senate on February 27, 2018
Passed 31 to 18 in the Senate on February 27, 2018.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Passed Legislature.
Signed by Gov. Jay Inslee on March 6, 2018

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