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2017 House Bill 1298: Prohibiting employers from asking about arrests or convictions before an applicant is determined otherwise qualified for a position
Introduced by Rep. Lillian Ortiz-Self (Mukilteo) (D) on January 16, 2017
  Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Labor & Workplace Standards Committee on January 16, 2017
Referred to the House Appropriations Committee on February 2, 2017
Substitute offered in the House on February 22, 2017
Prohibits an employer from, among other things, including any question on an application or inquiring into an applicant's criminal background until after the employer initially determines that the applicant is otherwise qualified for the position.
Referred to the House Rules Committee on February 28, 2017
Amendment offered by Rep. Matt Manweller (Ellensburg) (R) on March 1, 2017
Adds a preemption clause (cities, towns, counties, and other municipalities may enact only ordinances on employment laws related to criminal records that are consistent with the Fair Chance Act (Act) and local ordinances in existence as of the effective date of the Act that are inconsistent are preempted and repealed).
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on March 1, 2017
Received in the Senate on March 3, 2017
Referred to the Senate Commerce,Labor & Sports Committee on March 3, 2017
Received in the House on January 8, 2018
Referred to the House Labor & Workplace Standards Committee on January 8, 2018
Substitute offered in the House on January 9, 2018
Prohibits an employer from, among other things, including any question on an application or inquiring into an applicant's criminal background until after the employer initially determines that the applicant is otherwise qualified for the position.
Amendment offered by Rep. Matt Manweller (Ellensburg) (R) on February 7, 2018
Adds a preemption clause (cities, towns, counties, and other municipalities may enact only ordinances on employment laws related to criminal records that are consistent with the Fair Chance Act (Act) and local ordinances in existence as of the effective date of the Act that are inconsistent are preempted and repealed)..
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on February 7, 2018
Received in the Senate on February 9, 2018
Referred to the Senate Labor & Commerce Committee on February 9, 2018
Amendment offered in the Senate on February 21, 2018
Enacts the Washington Fair Chance Act. Prohibits employers from making inquiries related to criminal records until after initially determining the applicant is qualified for the position..
Referred to the Senate Ways & Means Committee on February 22, 2018
Referred to the Senate Rules Committee on February 26, 2018
Amendment offered by Sen. Michael Baumgartner (Spokane) (R) on February 28, 2018
Changes the definition of "employer" to include any person acting in the interest of an employer, directly or indirectly, who employs 15 or more persons, and does not include any religious or sectarian organization not organized for private profit.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on February 28, 2018
Amendment offered by Sen. Michael Baumgartner (Spokane) (R) on February 28, 2018
Makes prohibitions on employers from inquiring about criminal backgrounds, and advertising and having policies to exclude individuals with criminal backgrounds inapplicable to positions: (1) Requiring certain bonding or surety; (2) where public entity contracts prohibit sending workers with criminal history; (3) for sales or services at residential properties; and (4) in a home-based business.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on February 28, 2018
Amendment offered by Sen. Michael Baumgartner (Spokane) (R) on February 28, 2018
Specifies records that employers must retain for 3 years, which may not be extended by local governments except ordinances in existence on the effective date.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on February 28, 2018
Amendment offered by Sen. Michael Baumgartner (Spokane) (R) on February 28, 2018
Removes the provisions: (1) That the act may not be construed to interfere with local government current and future laws that provide additional protections to individuals with criminal records; and (2) that local government laws that provide lesser protections conflict with this chapter and may not be enforced. Preempts local governments from enacting laws and ordinances relating to employment laws related to criminal records, except as authorized by state laws.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on February 28, 2018
Amendment offered by Sen. Phil Fortunato (Auburn) (R) on February 28, 2018
The Attorney General's office must allow a 90-day period to correct the violation before assessing a second violation..
The amendment failed by voice vote in the Senate on February 28, 2018
Received in the House on March 3, 2018
Passed 52 to 44 in the House on March 3, 2018.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Passed the Legislature.
Signed by Gov. Jay Inslee on March 13, 2018

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