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2013 Senate Bill 5197: Requiring measures to promote safe school buildings
  1. Introduced by Sen. Bruce Dammeier (Puyallup) (R) on January 23, 2013, requires every school to have at least one silent alarm located in its administrative offices to alert local police directly that a law enforcement is needed at the school, and appropriated five million dollars for this purpose. This act also requires all new or remodeled schools to contain a mechanism by which the exterior school doors can be electronically locked from the administrative offices; to be designed to restrict the general public from entering the school through the administrative offices; and to be able to electronically lock administrative office doors to prohibit access to the rest of the school building. (See also HB 1811).
    • Referred to the Senate Early Learning & K-12 Education Committee on January 23, 2013.
      • Substitute offered to the Senate Early Learning & K-12 Education Committee on February 5, 2013, provides that chool districts must implement a panic alarm system by December 1, 2014. The Superintendent of Public Instruction must create a model policy regarding panic alarm systems by June 1, 2014. School boards of directors must strongly consider installing a perimeter security control mechanism or system on all school campuses.
    • Referred to the Senate Ways & Means Committee on February 5, 2013.
      • Substitute offered in the Senate on February 8, 2013, provides that model policy regarding panic alarm systems: ?includes the school safety advisory committee in the group to work with the Superintendent of Public Instruction in developing model policy. Elements to be given preference in future school building plans and designs: excludes from these provisions, remodeling projects of less than 40 percent of the existing school building; removes language requiring the highest level of security in future designs and plans and replaces it with factors to guide design toward the optimal level for the site and in view of current technology and practices; and narrows the elements that must be given preference to the optimal security for the site: direct control and observation of members of the public entering the school; and limiting the number of entrances through which the public has access. The requirement for giving preference to the creation of mantraps is eliminated.
    • Referred to the Senate Rules Committee on February 8, 2013.
  2. Passed 47 to 0 in the Senate on February 11, 2013, provides that School districts must implement a panic alarm system by December 1, 2014. The Superintendent of Public Instruction must create a model policy regarding panic alarm systems by June 1, 2014. School boards of directors must strongly consider installing a perimeter security control mechanism or system on all school campuses.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  3. Received in the House on February 13, 2013.
    • Referred to the House Education Committee on February 13, 2013.
      • Amendment offered in the House on April 2, 2013, provides that rather than requiring districts either to develop a panic alarm system or use a model policy for a panic alarm system by December 1, 2014, districts are required to work with local law enforcement to develop an emergency response system to expedite the response and arrival of law enforcement. Districts must submit a progress report by December 1, 2014. Districts are required to consider, rather than strongly consider or give preference to, installing perimeter security control and using building designs with certain safety features. The SSAC must develop model policies regarding emergency response appropriate for a range of scenarios, and develop recommendations for incorporating specified school safety features in the planning and design of new or remodeled facilities. A report is required by December 1, 2013.
      • The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on April 15, 2013.
    • Referred to the House Capital Budget Committee on April 3, 2013.
      • Amendment offered in the House on April 8, 2013, clariies that the purpose of the provisions requiring school districts to consider installing perimeter security controls on all campuses, and consider certain safety features in the design of new construction or major remodeling of school facilities, is to promote safety. Nothing in these provisions creates civil liability or creates a new cause of action or new theory of negligence against a school board, school district, or the state.
    • Referred to the House Rules Committee on April 9, 2013.
  4. Passed 95 to 0 in the House on April 15, 2013, requires school districts to work with law enforcement to implement emergency response systems, and requires a status report by December 1, 2014. Requires districts to consider installing a perimeter security control mechanism on all school campuses and consider building plans with certain safety features in future school construction projects. Directs the School Safety Advisory Committee to adopt model policies and make recommendations on these topics by December 1, 2013. Directs the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction to award grants to districts, if funds are appropriated, to implement emergency response systems.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  5. Received in the Senate on April 19, 2013.
  6. Passed 47 to 0 in the Senate on April 19, 2013, provides that districts must work with local law enforcement to develop an emergency response system to expedite the response and arrival of law enforcement. Districts must submit a progress report by December 1, 2014. Districts must consider installing perimeter security control and using building designs with certain safety features. The School Safety Advisory Committee must develop model policies regarding emergency response appropriate for a range of scenarios, and develop recommendations for incorporating specified school safety features in the planning and design of new or remodeled facilities. A report is required by December 1, 2013. The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction must allocate grants on a competitive basis, if funds are appropriated, for districts to implement emergency response systems. Nothing in the provisions of the bill create civil liability or create a new cause of action or new theory of negligence against a school board, school district, or the state.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  7. Signed by Gov. Jay Inslee on May 14, 2013.

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