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2009 House Bill 1498: regarding firearms possession of people who have been involuntarily committed
  1. Introduced by Rep. Ross Hunter, (Medina) (D) on January 22, 2009, requires that after a court commits a person to mental health treatment, that the committing court forward the person’s driver’s license information to the department of licensing within three judicial days. Also requires that the court send id information to the national instant criminal background check system index.
    • Referred to the House Judiciary Committee on January 22, 2009.
      • Referred to the House Rules Committee on February 2, 2009.
  2. Passed 97 to 0 in the House on March 5, 2009.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  3. Received in the Senate on March 7, 2009.
    • Referred to the Senate Human Services & Corrections Committee on March 7, 2009.
    • Referred to the Senate Rules Committee on March 23, 2009.
  4. Passed 39 to 1 in the Senate on April 13, 2009.
    Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No"

  5. Signed by Gov. Christine Gregoire on April 30, 2009, prohibits possession of firearms by persons who have been involuntarily committed for mental health treatment under the 14-day commitment process. Requires courts to forward a disqualified person's identifying information to the Department of Licensing (DOL) and the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS). Requires courts to notify the DOL, the Department of Social and Health Services, and the NICS when a court reinstates the right to possess a firearm for a person who was previously involuntarily committed. Revises the process for restoration of the right to possess a firearm for those persons who have been involuntarily committed. Amends the involuntary commitment statutes to require notice regarding the loss of firearm rights if a person is involuntarily committed.

Comments

Re: 2009 House Bill 1498 (regarding firearms possession of people who have been involuntarily committed)  by Jim G on January 24, 2009 

 This appears to be a case of making a bad law worse. An unalienable right can not be taken away without due process of law and an involuntary committment does not justify taking away an unalienable right. Am I missing something here or is this just another case of the "gun grabbers" laying the groundwork to try and give "mental health proffessionals" the power to deny the right to keep and bear arms at whim?



2009 House Bill 1498 (regarding firearms possession of people who have been involuntarily committed)  by admin on January 1, 2001 
Introduced in the House on January 22, 2009

Click here to view bill details.

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